Microsoft announced New Windows 10 Devices

This is going to be my personal architectural change of this year … ;-)

Upcoming Events by Microsoft and AWS

The behemoths of public cloud computing, AWS and Microsoft, continue to lure developers and architects to their cloud platform by offering free virtual events.

Microsoft announced AzureCon, a virtual event that will take place on September 29, 2015 (9:00 a.m. PDT). AzureCon relies on last year’s AzureConf and will include live, interactive and on-demand sessions. You can watch the content live or on-demand after the event.

AWS will host re:Invent 2015 from October 6 – 9, 2015. If you can’t make it to Las Vegas, you can watch the live streams. Of course, you can watch the sessions after the events too.

I highly recommend both events because they support the effective knowledge transfer and are a great opportunity to hear about the latest innovations in the public cloud arena. Therefore, mark your calender and save the links!

The Links and Knowledge We Have to Share

Recently I found an interesting article by Hossein Derakhshan titled ‘The Web We Have to Save‘. Hossein was sentenced to jail because he blogged on Iran-related topics and motivated other Iranians to start blogging. After he spend six years in jail, he was abruptly pardoned and freed. During the time in jail he actually missed major events like social media and the raise of companies like Facebook, Instragram, WhatsApp, Youtube, etc. Thus, he was confronted with a major shift how the Web developed so far and it is used today.
In his article he elaborates on his experiences with social media and compares the current usage of the Web with the one he used to know. He argues that a few social media companies dominate the way and type of information people access over the Internet. Hossein criticizes the vast devaluation of the hyperlink because the major social media companies constrain the usage of links on their platforms. Some of them are even constrain the usage of external links and manipulate user traffic to stick to their platform. He concludes that we experience a decline of diversity and opinions on the Web today.
Although Hossein’s experience and conclusion isn’t new – I’m observing the same movement for a while – I really think that he put this development brilliantly into words. I share his observations but I’m not sure about the magnitude of this trend. Maybe I’m biased in favour of information technology because that was (and still is) the main motivation for me to get access to some network and share information, experiences, software, games, knowledge etc. with people around the world. I still remember the 1980s when this access was only provided by some local bulletin board systems (BBS) and companies like CompuServe. Meanwhile the technologies evolved, especially the Internet and Web led to disruptive changes in almost every domain.
‘Information at your fingertips‘ was concept that was presented by Bill Gates initially in 1994. Today, I think this concept is real but the current Web is developing even beyond the fundamental idea behind this concept. Nowadays we can access so much information that we need dedicated technologies like search engines, data analysis tools, etc. to guide us through the vast amount of information. Otherwise there is still so much valuable information (and therefore knowledge too) available in books, journals, newspapers, etc. that is not directly accessible via the Internet or Web.
In addition to Hossein’s observations, I think of two related trends. First, information that is not available on the Internet or Web, is assumed to not exist. Therefore, it is simply ignored and sometimes concepts, ideas, etc. are developed twice without any notice. I’ve observed this attitude in the domain of computer science and particularly information systems management. Second, the proliferation of information doesn’t correlate with the quality of information. The quality of information is, of course, defined by the consumer but overall I wonder whether really all the information has some value. I’m specifically thinking of all the data that is produced and uploaded on social media platforms. Nevertheless, at least the ad industry is paying a lot of money for such data… On the other hand, I really believe that there is value in technologies like for example big data or the Internet of Things that isn’t directly related to advertising.
In summary, I draw the following conclusions. First, respect the free Internet/Web and appreciate the freedom of speech and opinion. Don’t take both for granted. There’s still restriction, censorship and arbitrariness. Second, consider the existing knowledge beyond the Web. Each domain has, of course, its own history and nature of knowledge sources. Nevertheless, keep in mind that the Web is definitely not the only one. Third, support the communication and collaboration beyond the major social media companies and therefore the freedom of links. There is something beyond those social media platform. Fourth, I should revive my blog. Although it’s not dealing with political topics, it supports all the conclusions mentioned above. Of course, the scope is focussed on the domain of architectural change management but that’s fine. Therefore, subscribe and watch out for updates!

The Open Group released ArchiMate 2.1

Actually ArchiMate 2.1 is a specification maintenance release incorporating comments, corrections and clarification issues which were raised since version 2.0.
For further details with respect to the changes refer to this official blog post by The Open Group. In addition a detailed listing of the changes is available as a dedicated document.
Only hours after the release, vendors of flexible EAM tools announced support to version 2.1… ;-)

The Open Group Introduced New Standards Supporting Risk Management

At the latest The Open Group conference in London the Security Forum introduced version 2.0 of the Risk Taxonomy (O-RT) technical standard and released the new technical standard Risk Analysis (O-RA). The new version of the Risk Taxonomy standard incorporates some minor updates based on the feedback by practitioners that have been using it. As a companion to it, the Risk Analysis standard provides a process framework that supports FAIR-based risk analysis.
For further details refer to the official blog posts by The Open Group that summarize both standards quite good (part I, partII).
I’ve added both standards to the knowledge base section IT Strategy and Governance.

Upcoming Tweet Jam on the Convergence of Emerging Technologies hosted by The Open Group

At first Gartner picked up the thought and named it ‘The Nexus of Forces’. IDC coined the term ‘third platform’ and The Open Group established a new forum named ‘Platform 3.0’. All of them recognized that there are several (emerging) technologies that are likely to converge in the future and potentially change the way businesses and people engage with each other. The lists and names of the technologies in scope differ depending on the organizations named before. In general they refer to the following technologies: social media, cloud computing, mobile computing, Internet of things and processing of big data.

From the perspective of the discipline of enterprise architecture management this convergence raises the question if (major) architectural changes are required to cope with this development.

To encourage knowledge exchange on this question, The Open Group will host a tweet jam on Thursday, June 6 at 9:00 a.m. PT/12:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m. GMT (see this blog post).

Please find below an initial set of links suggested for further reading.



The Open Group

The Open Group Released a Business Reference Model for the Natural Resources Industry

The Exploration, Mining, Metals and Minerals (EMMM) Forum of The Open Group developed a business reference model that has been approved as an Open Group Technical Standard (see The Open Group Blog post here). The reference model focuses on the natural resources industry, i.e. the high-level business processes of different mining organisations dealing with all metals and minerals. It consists of a documentation describing the concepts and definitions of the reference model and a model poster providing an abstract one-page-view of the model. These deliverables are available for download from The Open Group Bookstore (see here).